Current Issue

CONTENTS of Volume 21, Number 2, December 2015

  • NAMGYOO K. PARK, KIRA CHOI, JINJU LEE

  • The Hierarchy Myopia of Organizational Learning

  • ABSTRACT

    Previous studies have been interested in how to maximize both the efficiency and the effectiveness of organizational learning. On the flipside, some studies have investigated the critical barriers to learning. We suggest organizational hierarchy as another cause and theoretically explore how it can deter learning performance. Specifically, we argue that the configuration of structure determines a prevalent form of learning method in an organization to consequently affect its learning performance. Using simulation modeling, we show that non-hierarchical organizations may be a better learning environment than hierarchical organizations. We also show that the contextual factors, such as problem complexity and member regrouping, may affect the base-line result. This study subsequently calls for further attention be paid to the key issues concerning the hierarchy and organization learning performance.

  • KEYWORDS

    myopia of learning, hierarchy, organizational learning performance

  • JIN NAM CHOI, GOO HYEOK CHUNG, SUN YOUNG SUNG, ARIF NAZIR BUTT, MOATAZ SOLIMAN, JIN WOOK CHANG

  • Does Emotional Intelligence Matter in Interpersonal Processes? The Mediating Role of Emotion Management

  • ABSTRACT

    Researchers have identified emotional intelligence (EI) as an important individual characteristic that predicts interpersonal effectiveness. In this study, we identified three potential areas of emotion management (emotion expression, emotion recognition, and shaping counterpart emotion) that may be promoted by intrapersonal and interpersonal EI, and may mediate the effects of EI on interpersonal process and outcomes. Our analysis of data from a dyadic negotiation simulation indicates that EI predicts one aspect of emotion management (shaping counterpart emotion). Intrapersonal EI (but not interpersonal EI) increased counterpart positive emotion and decreased counterpart negative emotion during the negotiation simulation. Nevertheless, the overall relationship between EI and emotion management was weak. The present study highlighted the need for clearly conceptualizing and investigating emotional management through which individuals accrue interpersonal and performance benefits.

  • KEYWORDS

    emotional intelligence, emotion management, interpersonal behavior, negotiation

  • HEE SUB BYUN, JI HYE LEE, KYUNG SUH PARK

  • Impact of Controlling Shareholders on Corporate Social Responsibility under External Financial Constraints

  • ABSTRACT

    This study examines the relationship between the ownership of controlling shareholders and corporate social responsibility in Korea under external financial constraints. Empirical results show that a negative relationship is observed only in firms with fewer external financial constraints, while it is weaker or disappears for firms with more financial constraints. We obtain similar results when we use the level of environmental management as a proxy for corporate social responsibility. These results confirm that external financial constraints act as a monitoring mechanism and mitigate the agency problem of controlling shareholders.

  • KEYWORDS

    controlling shareholders, conflict of interest, corporate social responsibility, external financial constraints, Korea